Spies guide to dating

Reuters reported in 2015 it was seeking a sale that would have valued the firm at nearly

Reuters reported in 2015 it was seeking a sale that would have valued the firm at nearly $1 billion.

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Reuters reported in 2015 it was seeking a sale that would have valued the firm at nearly $1 billion.

It was said to be earning $75 million a year at the time.

Lavie and his co-entrepreneurs also founded Kaymera, a company designed to solve the exact problems NSO created: a super-secure phone for government officials.

The CEO of Kaymera is Avi Rosen, former head of RSA's Online Threats Managed Services group.

One source told FORBES Rosen took some of the RSA team along to Kaymera.

FORBES understands Kaymera is based just next door to NSO too.

And looking at the domains registered by NSO, they determined Pegasus could have been used across Turkey, Israel, Thailand, Qatar, Kenya, Uzbekistan, Mozambique, Morocco, Yemen, Hungary, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and Bahrain, though there was no clear evidence. But founder Omri Lavie keeps a remarkably tight ship.

He never speaks to press, recently emailing me: "I do not give interviews." That was despite an introduction through a friend in Tel-Aviv and requests spanning over two years.

billion.

It was said to be earning million a year at the time.

Lavie and his co-entrepreneurs also founded Kaymera, a company designed to solve the exact problems NSO created: a super-secure phone for government officials.

The CEO of Kaymera is Avi Rosen, former head of RSA's Online Threats Managed Services group.

One source told FORBES Rosen took some of the RSA team along to Kaymera.

FORBES understands Kaymera is based just next door to NSO too.

And looking at the domains registered by NSO, they determined Pegasus could have been used across Turkey, Israel, Thailand, Qatar, Kenya, Uzbekistan, Mozambique, Morocco, Yemen, Hungary, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and Bahrain, though there was no clear evidence. But founder Omri Lavie keeps a remarkably tight ship.

He never speaks to press, recently emailing me: "I do not give interviews." That was despite an introduction through a friend in Tel-Aviv and requests spanning over two years.

They might even have time for a brief confab with staffers at their sister company, a secure smartphone designer. But for the last six years, their everyday routine has been nothing less than extraordinary: create the world's most invasive mobile spy kit without ever exposing their work.They subsequently investigated the malware (full technical details of which can be found here and here), and within 10 days of being informed Apple issued the fix.The researchers later discovered Mexican journalist Rafael Cabrera had been targeted too.Thank you." Co-founder Shalev Hulio had not responded to messages.Both are believed to be alumni of Israel's famous Unit 8200 signals intelligence arm, as are many of the country's security entrepreneurs.

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